Paris Photographed With Film

Every time I pick up a film camera, I'm 14 years old again. Dad bought me a Canon A1 when I got into highschool and I was hooked. I didn't believe in myself enough to know I could make a career out of photography, but it was a part of me and I knew it always would be. Confession: I did have some coffee today, and it messes with my emotions something fierce, but when I start really talking photography, I get tears in my eyes. I can honestly say it was my first love and still has a grip on me tighter than ever. 

We took a Pentax film camera (borrowed from a dear friend), a Canon 5D Mark III, and our iPhones to Paris. These are a few of our film photographs and I don't know how they do it, but they make me feel something different than my digital camera and iPhone photos. There really is something about capturing the moment. I might be most proud of the last image. If you look closely, you'll see a gentleman photographing the Luxor Obelisk. He is nearly perfectly in line with the street lamps. I didn't set it up, but I saw it, and just about dropped my camera trying to get the settings there fast enough to photograph it. With my phone, I take 10-50 photos of something before it's right, but you can't do that with a film camera. 

People ask sometimes if we can give them tips on photography. We can and do give pointers, but what I've learned in nearly three decades of photographing, is that I've got to be in line with the universe. It's not mystical, but practical. I don't set things up very often-I watch and I wait and I feel and when it all comes together, if I'm ready, I get the shot. It's me, but it's also not me at all.

After the universe came together to help me capture these images, I sent the film to The Find Lab. Not only do they do an incredible job with my film, but they also teach how to expose and compose more effectively. They're incredible.   

Mandy DraperComment